Broad Shoulders Update

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Archive for the ‘from the news feed’ Category

Temporary Closure of Teamwork Englewood Offices

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Due to the fire that occurred overnight on Thursday, Teamwork Englewood offices will remain closed and resume normal hours September 2nd, 2014.

Partners and clients have been notified; please continue to check the Englewoodportal.org and Teamwork Englewood website for updates.  

Teamwork Englewood

815 W. 63rd Street 

ChicagoIL 60621 Phone:

(773) 488-6600

 

Written by Teamwork Englewood - Latest news

August 29th, 2014 at 6:00 pm

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Extreme Makeover: CLT Home Edition

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Who doesn’t enjoy a room makeover contest with stunning results? The competition is even more gratifying when it serves a dual purpose: delighting a happy homeowner, and fostering awareness of the community land trust (CLT) housing model.

Written by Rooflines

August 29th, 2014 at 11:00 am

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Moving Forward: It’s What We Do

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It is with an odd combination of relief and sadness that I see that my hometown, my community is no longer the lead in national headlines, no longer the first visual on national cable news and no longer the most trending hashtag.  My organization has owned almost 20 single family rental homes in Ferguson, Mo., for over a decade and Michael Brown graduated from the school district that is our targeted geography for our community building efforts. My first thoughts about this tragedy were shared in local media and can be found here. I wanted to use this space in Shelterforce, however, to talk my peers in our difficult field of housing and community development.  My message to you is to take a moment and make sure you are taking of yourself and your staff. I have been in this field since 1986 and have seen my share of difficult and challenging events in the lives of those we serve and our larger community.  The tragic death of Michael Brown, or Big Mike as he was known by his friends, has shaken me like nothing else I have experienced. I cannot understand how a parent buries their child and ask that each of you take a moment and steep in that idea. I further cannot understand how a police officer like Darren Wilson who previously had not had any issues suddenly is thrust into the role of villain and has had his life ruined. I will leave it to the justice system to work through all the issues in this case and hope that all the protesters continue to push our local prosecutor to ensure a fair, just trial.  The picture above is of me and a number of Mike’s fellow 2014 graduates from Normandy High School. My organization,Beyond Housing, has the unique opportunity to send this talented group to Carnegie Hall for a choir competition. These young folks are talented, passionate and destined for great things.  So was Mike. How do we in this work come to terms with the sadness, grief, and trauma that encroaches on our daily efforts to make change in our communities? 

Written by Rooflines

August 28th, 2014 at 11:00 am

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Literary charades game night to benefit West Town library

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By Gladys Alcazar-Anselmo

Gather your team now for the East Village Association's second library fundraiser, a Sept. 25 charades competition. Teams of four will “act out” book titles without speaking, while other members of their team try quickly to guess the title.

“West Town Literary Charades Madness” runs from 6 to 9pm at Roots Homemade Pizza, 1924 W. Chicago Ave. The final four teams, with the fastest completion times, compete for the crown of 2014 West Town Champions.

Winners will receive prizes from local businesses and sponsors, plus bragging rights for the year. Proceeds from this evening’s event will be directed to future programming at the West Town Branch Library.

Event proceeds help library staff offer free programming that would not be possible without local fundraising efforts.

This year’s programming goals includes expansion of a children’s chess program that teaches beginners and pairs intermediate and expert players to challenge one another. The branch plans more hands-on events like last year’s spice workshop by Steven Tobiason, owner of Epic Spices; documentary film screenings; book readings with local authors, historians and documentarians; and music performances for young children, teachers and parents.

The West Town Branch offers monthly book discussions for adults and tweens, and conducts a regular toddler story time for ages 18 to 36 months and a lap-sit story time for children 6 to 18 months.

On the ground floor of the historic Goldblatt's building at 1625 W. Chicago Ave., the library opened Sept. 11, 2010 and is an integral part of East Village and the West Town community. It occupies 13,300 square feet of the building in a beautiful, loft-style space that houses more than 50 computers for adults, teens and children, and a group study room.

Children's and adult reading areas provide a comfortable, contemplative space overlooking busy and bustling Chicago Avenue. Their collection reflects the diverse and multi-cultural population with books in Spanish, Polish and Ukrainian.

This branch circulates more than 9,000 materials every month and serves an average of 2,500 patrons each week in person. Direct services to early childhood, school-age and teen children total nearly 1,800 participants a year and the programs continues to grow.

For more information on the event, write evafundraiser@gmail.com. Register a team, purchase tickets or make a donation here.

Written by Webmaster

August 27th, 2014 at 10:49 pm

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Literary charades game night to benefit West Town library

without comments

By Gladys Alcazar-Anselmo

Gather your team now for the East Village Association's second library fundraiser, a Sept. 25 charades competition. Teams of four will “act out” book titles without speaking, while other members of their team try quickly to guess the title.

“West Town Literary Charades Madness” runs from 6 to 9pm at Roots Homemade Pizza, 1924 W. Chicago Ave. The final four teams, with the fastest completion times, compete for the crown of 2014 West Town Champions.

Winners will receive prizes from local businesses and sponsors, plus bragging rights for the year. Proceeds from this evening’s event will be directed to future programming at the West Town Branch Library.

Event proceeds help library staff offer free programming that would not be possible without local fundraising efforts.

This year’s programming goals includes expansion of a children’s chess program that teaches beginners and pairs intermediate and expert players to challenge one another. The branch plans more hands-on events like last year’s spice workshop by Steven Tobiason, owner of Epic Spices; documentary film screenings; book readings with local authors, historians and documentarians; and music performances for young children, teachers and parents.

The West Town Branch offers monthly book discussions for adults and tweens, and conducts a regular toddler story time for ages 18 to 36 months and a lap-sit story time for children 6 to 18 months.

On the ground floor of the historic Goldblatt's building at 1625 W. Chicago Ave., the library opened Sept. 11, 2010 and is an integral part of East Village and the West Town community. It occupies 13,300 square feet of the building in a beautiful, loft-style space that houses more than 50 computers for adults, teens and children, and a group study room.

Children's and adult reading areas provide a comfortable, contemplative space overlooking busy and bustling Chicago Avenue. Their collection reflects the diverse and multi-cultural population with books in Spanish, Polish and Ukrainian.

This branch circulates more than 9,000 materials every month and serves an average of 2,500 patrons each week in person. Direct services to early childhood, school-age and teen children total nearly 1,800 participants a year and the programs continues to grow.

For more information on the event, write evafundraiser@gmail.com. Register a team, purchase tickets or make a donation here.

Written by Webmaster

August 27th, 2014 at 10:49 pm

Posted in from the news feed

Bike, eat, repeat!

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Come for a ride with us! On Sunday, September 7, you're invited to join us for the Four-Star Bike & Chow. 

This go-at-your-own-pace ride follows four bike-friendly routes (see right) curated by our friends at the Chicago Cycling Club.

Expect to encounter hidden parks, eye-catching architecture and plenty of Chicago history.

Not only is the ride interesting and fun, we’ve made it convenient.

We offer mechanical support, volunteers along the route to point the way, rest stops and water stops to ensure you enjoy your ride.

And of course, your registration fee supports the Active Transportation Alliance’s efforts to make cycling, walking and public transportation easier and safer in Chicagoland.

When it’s time to take a break -- in addition to the to-be-expected water, fresh fruit and cookies waiting for you -- we’ll have scrumptious samples from a host of Chicago restaurants:

New Furama
nana
Pierogi Wagon
DonerMen
Phoenix
Bridgeport Pasty
Lou Malnati’s

Check out our menu page for details on what treats to expect at which rest stop. Or check the punch card in your rider packet (which you will need to enjoy the treats).

Four routes of different distances start and end at the UIC campus.

And save room for a tasty post-ride Revolution Brewery beer at the post-ride festival. Register today!

Written by kleisner

August 27th, 2014 at 9:53 pm

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Game night at Roots: Team up for Literary Charades

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Written by Webmaster

August 27th, 2014 at 2:07 pm

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Ferguson, Sanford and the Persistence of Violent Racism

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“Wonder when I’ll find paradise // Somewhere there’s a home sweet and nice” –WAR, The World is a Ghetto By now, many of you have probably have read the open letter to Michael Brown’s family from Sybrina Fulton (Trayvon Martin’s mother). It is heartbreaking to think about the deep loss, the deep injustice, that these families have had to bear. Many of the smaller facts and even the bigger issues between the Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin shootings are different. Brown was shot by a policeman, Martin was shot by a volunteer on neighborhood watch. In Ferguson, there are major secondary issues around the militarization of police; in Florida, big sideline issues were about stand your ground laws, gun control, gated communities. But at the simple core, both Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin were murdered because they were young and black and male. I lead with these two things—the parents’ grief and loss and the racist violence directed at young black men—because they should be front and center in our discussions about Michael and Trayvon. All of us outside observers—pundits, bloggers, academics, advocates, organizers, arm chair (or laptop) quarterbacks—discuss these tragic shootings, through our own lenses and from our own contexts. We generate paragraphs of text, tables of statistics (percent of police who live in the communities in which they police; the increasing number of guns in the hands of private citizens), color-coded and time-sequenced maps (the increase of poverty in Ferguson over the past ten years; segregation by race in St. Louis) and mostly we talk and talk and talk. And these conversations are important. These shootings are important touchstones. They expose deep and complicated tangles of issues around race, class, gender; about violence, fear, safety; about our country, about where we are going, about what we value; about justice; about the mythologies of the American Dream. These are important issues to discuss, to act upon. We need to have these hard conversations in order to better progress as a society. But in our discussions about what has happened, in our calls to action, in our advocacy for new policies and practices, it is easy to lose sight of the simple, central reality of loss and of injustice. So I wanted to call out these core realities before I jump into my own punditry. All that being said, this blog post is about the demographics of Ferguson and Sanford (the places where Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin were killed, respectively). I want to build off of Miriam Axel-Lute’s recent post about the dangerous rhetoric of labeling poor neighborhoods in terms of deficits and borrow some of her points about the fact that how we talk/think about issues often undermines our ability to change things for the better.

Written by Rooflines

August 27th, 2014 at 11:00 am

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Believing in Homeownership: How It Affects the Desire to Buy

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Last week I wrote about the first part of my recent research into beliefs about the benefits homeownership: messages conveyed to the American public during the 20th and early 21st centuries on outcomes associated with owning, which I argue fostered a set of commonly-held beliefs about the benefits of homeownership that persist today. The second part of the study considers whether and how much these beliefs contribute to individual decisions about owning or renting, using data from the 2011 Fannie Mae National Housing Survey on renters’ intentions to buy homes in the future. Survey respondents reported how much they agreed with statements about four outcomes potentially associated with homeownership—that it provides a good place to raise children, a safe physical structure, more control over living space, and more space for families —as well as one statement about financial advantages of owning over renting. I estimated the effect of these beliefs on respondents’ stated intentions to buy a home in the future, controlling for other things likely to affect that decision, including individual socio-demographic characteristics (age, race, marital and family status), financial circumstances (employment status, current income, total debt, ability to quality for a mortgage, financial sacrifice required to own), and satisfaction with renting.

Written by Rooflines

August 26th, 2014 at 11:00 am

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Website tracks Chicago building demolitions, teardowns

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A page lists building permits issued in and near East Village.

East Village Association board minutes for Aug. 11, 2014, submitted by Catherine Garypie

CONSTRUCTION DATABASE

Property purchases, architect discussions, permit applications: All happen very fast ... faster than neighborhood associations can keep up.

Steven Vance, a programmer and Streetblog Chicago blogger, developed a database of construction activity at licensedchicagocontractors.com. Vance gave a presentation with Daniel Ronan,program coordinator at the National Public Housing Museum, and Ryan Lakes, an architect at Solomon Cordwell Buenz.

The database includes building violations and permits. The idea is to give more power to residents. The site's adding Special Service Area boundaries, and may track Tax Increment Financing dollars spent.

EVA boundaries have been added to the database. A subscription service provides weekly e-mails and allows tracking of an individual company (developer, owner, expediter, etc.)

Update: Discussion at this meeting led to a new feature: When you click on a place like the East Village page, you'll see a small link under the heading that says, "List all addresses and historic resources." This shows every address in the boundary, based on Cook County property tax billing information, and whether or not it's orange or red rated.

Chicago's updating its building database. The hope is that city will place application in the data portal as soon as it is accepted, not only when the application is approved.

When a developer submits an application, they come in with a new company, usually named after the address of the development. That makes it difficult to track what developers are doing. It may be possible to track by tax ID.

City databases have triggers: A liquor application will trigger a notification to police, alderman, etc. Maybe that notification system can get onto the site.

The database can be filtered in different ways, such as cost or type. Lists can be printed, exported in Excel format or put on your clipboard.

Possible future feature: a teardown finder. "Recent Teardown Permits" could list a demolition permit and new construction permit issued for the same address within 180 days of each other. Multiple building violations also signal a probable teardown. Multiple police reports sometimes are indications.

Also, if floor area ratio on structure is low relative to the zoning, particularly R4 in East Village, it is likely a teardown risk. Search results could explain the risk: "Given this data, it is 60% likely that this building will be demolished in the next 2 years." This may be a complicated algorithm.

The database needs help from EVA: Zoning Board of Appeals & Planning Commission need to make agendas more accessible. Can EVA request this? More transparency is needed.

Ideas for database:

  • Not sure whether a comment section be helpful. Vance may consider allowing a neighborhood association to provide additional info. Comments and notes would need to be screened. Maybe a discussion forum? Maybe search for "Demolition averted" or "upzoning denied."
  • Encourage city discussion of design and development.
  • Maybe making a tracking system for decision makers (like, compare aldermen, for example). Also tracking contributions to the decisionmakers from developers would be helpful (alderman).
  • Maybe track electronic billboards.
  • Maybe track mass property purchases by one party.

EVA would like to track what was missed in the historic building survey.

PROPOSAL TO CHANGE LOCATIONS OF SEVERAL STREET FESTS

May move Renegade Craft Fair and also Fashion Fest & New Orleans Fest. Neal McKnight is concerned and will follow up.

POLISH TRIANGLE PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

Rehab Polish Triangle station: McKnight is working with Scott Rappe. Waiting to hear what CTA has planned.

NEXT BOARD MEETING

EVA will co-sponsor 1st and 2nd Ward debates with many different neighborhood associations (CGNA, UVNA, etc). 2 debates for each ward in mid-November and January 2015.

ST. BONIFACE

St. Boniface is in danger of demolition. Alderman's not returning calls, developer's not returning calls, city's not returning calls. McKnight will talk to Rappe.

NEW SIGN ON CHCIAGO AVENUE

A "changing image sign" is coming to 2000 W. Chicago, above Red Apple.

LIBRARY FUNDRAISER SEPT. 25, 6-9pm.

Literary Charades (teams will guess book titles) with competing teams of 4 people. We have some really good prizes already for the winners.

Food will be provided. Cash bar. Ticket to attend. Ticket price break for charade team members. Ticket prices to be set soon by fundraiser committee.

STATUS OF PEABODY ELEMENTARY SALE

EVA will follow up.

Meeting starts 6:42pm, adjourns 7:45pm at West Town Bakery & Diner, 1916 W. Chicago Ave. Attending: McKnight, Alcazar, Garypie, Anselmo, M. Van Dam, M. Isaacson, A. Hauser (dnaInfo reporter).

Written by Webmaster

August 25th, 2014 at 5:13 pm

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